Constance Jaquay

Actor. Writer. Theatre Producer & Performance Artist exploring the many facets of what it means to be human. I’m a wild animal, untamed searching for freedom in the chaos of the jungle-seeking the calm within the storm.

Broadway unites to protest police violence and honor Eric Garner

Because this is one of the many ways in which theatre reveals its power. Because Eric Garner deserved to live. Because we all have voices.

“There is no greater evidence of how tragic things are for dark-skinned women in Hollywood than the fact that they can’t even get hired to play dark-skinned women.”

—   

Marc Lamont Hill on the casting of Nina Simone

Because this sentence breaks my heart while filling me with joy. Because dark-skinned women are creating our own work and need not be left to a “Hollywood” standard. Because we stand on the backs of those who came before and serve as a bridge for those who follow.

Misty Copeland's Under Armour Ad Is Like Nothing You've Ever Seen

Because it’s Misty Copeland!

How the arts inspire change in Detroit

Because Detroit is killing all negative perceptions one may have about their city. Because they are & have always given voice to black artists. Because writers are being recognized as necessary contributors of the community. Because I’ve added this city to my list of must visit!

creative-cap:

For The Liberation of Mammy, Beverly McIver traveled to various locations in the southern U.S. to photograph and videotape African American domestic workers. McIver’s mother is a domestic laborer in this region and accompanied the artist when she traveled. McIver then created photographs of herself in blackface emulating her subjects and made a series of paintings from these images. Continue reading →
Starting September 2, Beverly will be participating in the artist-in-residency at McColl Center for Art + Innovation.

Because it speaks so loudly. 

creative-cap:

For The Liberation of Mammy, Beverly McIver traveled to various locations in the southern U.S. to photograph and videotape African American domestic workers. McIver’s mother is a domestic laborer in this region and accompanied the artist when she traveled. McIver then created photographs of herself in blackface emulating her subjects and made a series of paintings from these images. Continue reading →

Starting September 2, Beverly will be participating in the artist-in-residency at McColl Center for Art + Innovation.

Because it speaks so loudly. 

lostinurbanism:

A Sunday Kinfolk Story (Intro and Casting) + Hamilton Multimedia, LLC 

       ”What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?” 

Written by D. VerrtahMarcus Smith (Behind The Lens), Russell Hamilton (Multimedia), King Texas (Creative Director) and myself, Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Lost in Urbanism + Sunday Kinfolk)

While staring in the face of racism, this story follows a young man’s journey as he comes to terms with his identity. As we extract events from America’s history and weave them with fictional undertones, we explore the truth behind his mother’s legacy, his father’s affiliation with the movement and the makings of a black superhero.

Visit Sunday Kinfolk to get additional information on casting and creative collaborations with this project.

Because I can’t wait too see this piece-for there is no doubt it will be of legend! 

(via lostinurbanism)

Black-Owned Businesses Are Quietly Powering Detroit's Resurgence, But No One's Talking About It

Because black people have always contributed to the development of society. 

lostinurbanism:

A Sunday Kinfolk Story (Intro and Casting) + Hamilton Multimedia, LLC 

       ”What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?” 

Written by D. VerrtahMarcus Smith (Behind The Lens), Russell Hamilton (Multimedia), King Texas (Creative Director) and myself, Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Lost in Urbanism + Sunday Kinfolk)

While staring in the face of racism, this story follows a young man’s journey as he comes to terms with his identity. As we extract events from America’s history and weave them with fictional undertones, we explore the truth behind his mother’s legacy, his father’s affiliation with the movement and the makings of a black superhero.

This montage sets the climate for an upcoming Sunday Kinfolk story and multimedia production. As the story spans several generations and eras, we have several roles to fill. No experience necessary, just creative passion.

Visit Sunday Kinfolk to get additional information on casting and creative collaborations with this project. 

* Production will take place in Metropolis (Chicago)

YES!

(via emmangs)

The faces of the forgotten: Heartbreaking plight of the 64,000 black women missing across America... as the country turns a blind eye

Because nearly 40% of women who disappear are black. Because what are we doing about it? 

heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas. At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938
Source: American Memory, Library of Congress

Because this was everything to me just now

heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas. At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938

Source: American Memory, Library of Congress

Because this was everything to me just now

(via ladyfresh)