Constance Jaquay

Actor. Writer. Theatre Producer & Performance Artist exploring the many facets of what it means to be human. I’m a wild animal, untamed searching for freedom in the chaos of the jungle-seeking the calm within the storm.

lostinurbanism:

A Sunday Kinfolk Story (Intro and Casting) + Hamilton Multimedia, LLC 

       ”What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?” 

Written by D. VerrtahMarcus Smith (Behind The Lens), Russell Hamilton (Multimedia), King Texas (Creative Director) and myself, Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Lost in Urbanism + Sunday Kinfolk)

While staring in the face of racism, this story follows a young man’s journey as he comes to terms with his identity. As we extract events from America’s history and weave them with fictional undertones, we explore the truth behind his mother’s legacy, his father’s affiliation with the movement and the makings of a black superhero.

Visit Sunday Kinfolk to get additional information on casting and creative collaborations with this project.

Because I can’t wait too see this piece-for there is no doubt it will be of legend! 

(via lostinurbanism)

Black-Owned Businesses Are Quietly Powering Detroit's Resurgence, But No One's Talking About It

Because black people have always contributed to the development of society. 

lostinurbanism:

A Sunday Kinfolk Story (Intro and Casting) + Hamilton Multimedia, LLC 

       ”What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?” 

Written by D. VerrtahMarcus Smith (Behind The Lens), Russell Hamilton (Multimedia), King Texas (Creative Director) and myself, Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Lost in Urbanism + Sunday Kinfolk)

While staring in the face of racism, this story follows a young man’s journey as he comes to terms with his identity. As we extract events from America’s history and weave them with fictional undertones, we explore the truth behind his mother’s legacy, his father’s affiliation with the movement and the makings of a black superhero.

This montage sets the climate for an upcoming Sunday Kinfolk story and multimedia production. As the story spans several generations and eras, we have several roles to fill. No experience necessary, just creative passion.

Visit Sunday Kinfolk to get additional information on casting and creative collaborations with this project. 

* Production will take place in Metropolis (Chicago)

YES!

(via emmangs)

The faces of the forgotten: Heartbreaking plight of the 64,000 black women missing across America... as the country turns a blind eye

Because nearly 40% of women who disappear are black. Because what are we doing about it? 

heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas. At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938
Source: American Memory, Library of Congress

Because this was everything to me just now

heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas. At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938

Source: American Memory, Library of Congress

Because this was everything to me just now

(via ladyfresh)

Because this reminds me of the work we having been doing with Chitlin’ Blues: Dancing in the Grey.

LOVE IN MY LANGUAGE: PRE-ORDER

alexandraelle:

"Love in my Language" is the sophomore title of self published author, Alexandra Elle. Equipped with 124 pages of self discovery, Alex shares with you some of her deepest and darkest moments that are intertwined with faith, hope and finding her light. This body of work explores Alex’s journey of being a young mother with baggage and daddy issues, all the while trying to find her way and purpose in life. The pages of "Love in my Language" alternate between short writings and poetry. You will get a true look into the life of the author and she hopes that readers take away peace after reading the pages.

"Love in my Language" has a 30+ page journal in the back for readers to indulge in.

THIS IS A LISTING FOR A PRE-ORDER OF 100 BOOKS. The official release day is 7/7/14. All books will be shipped by 7/21 at the latest.

**Your book will be autographed with a note. These will not be personalized unless notified.***

If you miss this opportunity “Love in my Language” will be available on Amazon, Kindle and Createspace on 7/7/14.

Because I can’t wait to order this! Because Alexandra Elle is truth.

Because you already know!
mediadiversified:

Excerpt from photo essay ‘Fathering While Black Part 2 - On a Path of Forgiveness’
by Zun Lee
Contrary to the prevalent media caricature of black men as aggressive, violent, and reckless, the fathers I met were loving, affectionate, and responsible. They were by no means perfect, but showed tremendous resilience and strength, committed to being present one fatherly act at a time.
Black fathers negotiate a delicate balance between agency and representation, and their ways of parenting are much more diverse than is shown in the media. While carving out a distinct identity as black men, many fathers exhibit a very individual sense of responsibility and purpose, resulting in a richness of lived experiences that many politicians, media anchors, and academicians cannot – and don’t want to – see. There are thus many qualitative dimensions to being a responsible black father that are currently not being conveyed by census statistics or social services metrics but that are nonetheless crucial for successful parenting.Cultural criticism and academic discourse are equally far removed from actual lived experiences. It seems much easier to talk “about” black fathers, and not “with” them. There’s a cultivated jargon that allows academicians to converse with each other but that fails to cross into the very spaces where the necessary work has to happen: 
VIEW MORE

mediadiversified:

Excerpt from photo essay ‘Fathering While Black Part 2 - On a Path of Forgiveness’

by Zun Lee

Contrary to the prevalent media caricature of black men as aggressive, violent, and reckless, the fathers I met were loving, affectionate, and responsible. They were by no means perfect, but showed tremendous resilience and strength, committed to being present one fatherly act at a time.

Black fathers negotiate a delicate balance between agency and representation, and their ways of parenting are much more diverse than is shown in the media. While carving out a distinct identity as black men, many fathers exhibit a very individual sense of responsibility and purpose, resulting in a richness of lived experiences that many politicians, media anchors, and academicians cannot – and don’t want to – see. There are thus many qualitative dimensions to being a responsible black father that are currently not being conveyed by census statistics or social services metrics but that are nonetheless crucial for successful parenting.Cultural criticism and academic discourse are equally far removed from actual lived experiences. It seems much easier to talk “about” black fathers, and not “with” them. There’s a cultivated jargon that allows academicians to converse with each other but that fails to cross into the very spaces where the necessary work has to happen:

VIEW MORE

(via ladyfresh)

mediadiversified:

Excerpt from the photo essay 'Fathering While Black'
byZun Lee
Black fathers continue to be profiled in the media, and not just by the usual suspects. Why a broader perspective on representations of Black fatherhood remains largely outside of the public realm and what role visual storytelling could play to change that.
Black father absence is a contentiously debated social issue in the US and other countries. Too many Black men, so the argument goes, are missing, irresponsible, selfish, not stepping up to the plate. Visuals of deadbeat, absent Black fathers abound in mainstream media, often intended to sensationalize and ridicule rather than to raise awareness.
For example, consider this nugget of a “newsworthy” story - Orlando Shaw of Nashville, TN, father of 22 children by 14 women, sued for unpaid child support. This local blurb was featured in the week leading up to Father’s Day 2013, and went viral nationally in the US. A month later, there was even talk of the possibility of Mr. Shaw getting his own reality TV show.
The number of inspirational stories of everyday Black fatherhood receiving equal national attention around the same time period: zero. And just to reiterate, we’re talking about Father’s Day coverage!
In fact, research suggests that among non-cohabitating, unmarried fathers, Black men are more engaged (and stay engaged longer) in their children’s parenting than men of other ethnic groups.
VIEW MORE

mediadiversified:

Excerpt from the photo essay 'Fathering While Black'

byZun Lee

Black fathers continue to be profiled in the media, and not just by the usual suspects. Why a broader perspective on representations of Black fatherhood remains largely outside of the public realm and what role visual storytelling could play to change that.

Black father absence is a contentiously debated social issue in the US and other countries. Too many Black men, so the argument goes, are missing, irresponsible, selfish, not stepping up to the plate. Visuals of deadbeat, absent Black fathers abound in mainstream media, often intended to sensationalize and ridicule rather than to raise awareness.

For example, consider this nugget of a “newsworthy” story - Orlando Shaw of Nashville, TN, father of 22 children by 14 women, sued for unpaid child support. This local blurb was featured in the week leading up to Father’s Day 2013, and went viral nationally in the US. A month later, there was even talk of the possibility of Mr. Shaw getting his own reality TV show.

The number of inspirational stories of everyday Black fatherhood receiving equal national attention around the same time period: zero. And just to reiterate, we’re talking about Father’s Day coverage!

In fact, research suggests that among non-cohabitating, unmarried fathers, Black men are more engaged (and stay engaged longer) in their children’s parenting than men of other ethnic groups.

VIEW MORE

(via ladyfresh)